| Filed under

[Updated May 21] Seventeen cars were burglarized in Murieta South late Monday or early Tuesday, Security reported Tuesday.

Chief Greg Remson said three of the cars had property taken, including cash, a Konica digital camera and a cell phone. All the cars were unlocked and parked in driveways, he said.

On Wednesday, Remson said the first report came in at 11:30 p.m. Monday, and Security Patrol Officer Stacey Ramsey responded. Ramsey drove around the area and saw cars with their doors open but did not see suspects, Remson said. He said there was another car, locked, that the burglars possibly attempted to enter, and it carried a handprint.

The streets involved were Abierto Drive, Fescue Court, Verona Drive, Murieta South Parkway, Colbert Drive, Bent Grass Court, Jigger Court, Linksman Court, Acaso Court and Niblick Way.

Remson repeated a reminder he has made many times recently -- lock your car doors and do not leave any valuables inside.

Reacting to a suggestion made in the comments here Wednesday morning, Remson said establishing a volunteer patrol would require the CSD or Rancho Murieta Association to weigh liability issues.

There were seven car burglaries in April on the North and more than a dozen similar incidents on the North in March.


Nellie Bloom's picture
Joined: 08/03/2007
Posts: 362
Post rating: 587

Theft

I think it would be a big mistake to chalk these break in's up to teens.  EGUSD is having a big problem with car break in's around many of their schools - including CRES.  I think these are organized events.

Is there any interest in putting together Rancho Murieta's version of a Neighborhood Watch program?  We have so many excellent resources at our disposal.  Security, resident police officers etc.. I feel sure we can find a way to have community involvement without it becoming a witch hunt.  

What do you think? 

Doug Lewis's picture
Joined: 08/08/2007
Posts: 165
Post rating: 322

Crimes

Nellie could be right.  With the theft locations being closer to the highway its possible an outsider could be coming into the area.  The golf course makes an ideal path to move around undetected.  I saw a guy with a bed roll coming up from the river bed by 16 the other day. Not trying to cast blame, but just saying we need to keep an eye open in all directions.  Remember if it looks suspicious or out of place to you, report it.  Block watch is a good program but we have to remember we are the block.  That means looking out for our neighbors. Putting a watch  sign at the end of the block doesnt impress the bad guys much. If the fact we have fences, gates and guards doesnt impress them a sign certainly won't. 

 Also make sure your kids are aware of whats been reported. One, its for their safety, and also they are out and about more, and they often see and hear more then the adults do. The nights are getting warm and people are leaving their doors and windows open. If this is more than kids night shopping be aware that if the thief doesnt respect your car he probably wont respect your home either. 

If Chief Remson is short handed, Im sure there are some of us retired old bulls out here that would love to do a stake out or shine a flashlight around some under his direction.  Plus it would be a way for me to convince my wife I need a golf cart (horse) to patrol on.  After thousands of crime scenes I could probably even lift for prints. 

Keep your eyes and ears open neighbors.  Get involved and report it if you see it.  We dont need signs to watch out for each other.             

Doug Lewis, retired Detective Seattle Police Department

 

Doug Lewis

Myrna Solomon's picture
Joined: 07/31/2007
Posts: 427
Post rating: 745

break-ins

Myrna Solomon

Although I know there are many in RM who don't want to believe that these break-ins could be done by boys that live out here, but the reality is that from all of the information that I have seen, IT IS OUR CHILDREN. Now, maybe they invite accomplishes in from outside, but this is all home grown. I certainly agree that a Neighborhood Watch Program would be an excellent way to stop this because our Security can't be everywhere at once. I just don't want people to put their heads in the sand and be complacent and not except what is, instead of what your mind wants you to believe.

Myrna Solomon

Doug Lewis's picture
Joined: 08/08/2007
Posts: 165
Post rating: 322

Volunteers

When I suggested an "emphasis patrol" I wasn't trying to imply that we should get a bunch of locals out there running after people.  Anyone outside of paid security or law enforcement should have strictly a no contact, no approach policy both for liability and for their own safety.  On the other hand people should not think that  calling in  suspicious activity will create a liability.   That  is why some people mind their own business and don't get involved.  We are all eyes for the community and we should all keep an eye out for our community. Civic pride and civic duty isn't heard of much these days but I would like to think that its alive and well here.

  Keep security's phone number in your cell phone.  That way if your out for a walk or a ride in your cart, you will have it if you see a problem.  I would guess they can respond faster than Sac SO. Remember dailing 911 won't get security.

.  Most cases I have ever worked on were solved by physical evidence, witnesses and or tip information. Very few were "on viewed" by officers.  Even if you do not want a full investigation you should still report a crime.  This helps law enforcement learn of patterns, locations and the need for emphasis.  Some people are also afraid to call law enforcement just to tell them what they saw or heard.  Even if you feel the need to remain anonymous (I hope you won't), your information can help solve the puzzle.  Don't assume that nothing can or will be done about the problem.  There may not be enough information to lead to an arrest, but in the case of young juveniles, (if it is juveniles), just officials contacting their household can cause a problem to dry up.  

As we do have a limited number of patrol resources, and keeping in mind that very little "on view" crime is seen from a patrol car, we should all do our part to watch out for our community.  I was looking at those updated CCRs and there was something about homes not being allowed to have additional lighting outside such as floods.  I know we don't want to blind our neighbors but motion lighting can be affective as a crime deterrent. There is always the need to balance aesthetics with safety.  

And Chief,  you and your troops are having a tough enough time getting the boards here to define what your actual vs perceived duties are.  Do you  think that the boards or their attorneys could ever come up with a plan for what a citizen patrol would be allowed to do???     

Doug Lewis

 

Doug Lewis

Dawn Penman's picture
Joined: 08/15/2007
Posts: 6
Post rating: 0

Break Ins

Our vehicle was one of the ones broken into, however it was parked inside our garage. The side door to the garage was unlocked and they came in that way.  So you might want to lock your doors even if they are parked "safely" inside your garage.  

Dawn Marie Penman

Nellie Bloom's picture
Joined: 08/03/2007
Posts: 362
Post rating: 587

Neighborhood Watch

Thanks Chief Remson for your good work. We appreciate it.

 

"Reacting to a suggestion made in the comments here Wednesday morning, Remson said establishing a volunteer patrol would require the CSD or Rancho Murieta Association to weigh liability issues."

Does this include an "official" Neighborhood Watch program with training from the sheriff department?  It would be so disheartening if we got mired in red tape.

Thank you 

Your comments